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works. obviously the big story is the climate story and what happened in copenhagen a few weeks ago. i have been astonished watching the globals then after the copenhagen meeting. what happened there is perceived completely differently in europe than it is here and in utterly differently in india then it is in europe, so if you track the flow of blogs and columns that are coming across on this, the assessment ranges from catastrophe to success. my sense of the story is there were actually to copenhagen meetings. there was a formal treaty negotiation that has been going on a essentially since the united states framework convention on climate change was ratified by 190 some nations back in the early 1990's and culminated in copenhagen, and there was a very brief 12-hour head of state negotiation that took place at the end of the copenhagen meeting. the first negotiation, the formal one, failed. the second one, i will talk about that a little more in a moment but i want to give you some background to understand what was happening there. every discussion of international climate change neg
for an influx of refugees here. cbs news exposed it: a congressional judge dote the climate summit in copenhagen. now we can tell you how much it cost taxpayers as we followed the money. and steve hartman travels halfway around the world and finds the waltons? >> reporter: four generations. not only under one roof but sharing one bank account. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. he got the message: it's the economy middle-class voters most worried about. and with critical congressional elections coming up this year, president obama today rolled out a series of proposal designed to show he's on the case. chip reid is at the white house tonight and, chip, this is just the latest example of obama 2.0 reaching out to voters on main street. >> reporter: that's right, katie. the president is at the low point of his presidency right now and today he turned his attention to the middle-class to try to stop his downward slide. >> unfortunately, the middle-class has been under assault
such as spike its coverage not just copenhagen but it is going up and up and it seems we're doing something right and that is because the staff is so committed to speaking to journalists were in the old days they would sit in the office and do research. they are still doing that now but now they are more willing to talk to the press and that makes me happy also be cuss number one, we have a tremendous communications staff is an honor to work with it is like madmen without the cigarettes and booze. we have a leadership from the first-rate bert -- board fell lets us do what we want to do just like bloomberg president and steve ross miami dolphins owner, and al gore and i can go on. third we have a president who, for years, has been telling our staff which is growing to communicate and do it well. it is great to be with you and our great staff. before i call up jonathan lash to speak just a couple of logistical things. turnoff yourself of. he will speak half of the times "60 minutes" then open it up to answering your questions. you have myself end jessica over there in the black will have micr
of congress went to copenhagen and you got the bill. now we know just how big a bill. we'll follow the money next. why do women like you love activia light? sometimes i have no choice but to eat on the run... and to eat whatever happens to be around. heavy greasy food that's hard on my diet... and my digestive system. so i eat activia light every day. activia light, with bifidus regularis is clinically proven to help regulate your digestive system. mmmm. the new taste is better than ever. and with only 70 calories activia light helps make it easier to watch my weight. it helps me feel good and look good too! ♪ activia! caused by a completely blocked artery, another heart attack could be lurking, waiting to strike. a heart attack caused by a clot, one that could be fatal. but plavix helps save lives. plavix taken with other heart medicines, goes beyond what other heart medicines do alone, to provide greater protection against heart attack or stroke and even death by helping to keep blood platelets from sticking together and forming clots. ask your doctor about plavix. protection that helps
those are not the number one issues for them. why is it important to flight to copenhagen, not once but twice? so i'm not saying that to be smarty, so much as i am asking question, why aren't we listening to people when they say they are starting for jobs lexa they're looking for economic rebounds. why do we look at the 16 million plus women in this country who currently owns all or part of a small business, and think of the untold millions of other american women who would love to harness their entrepreneurial spirit and create a little bit of a nest egg in flexibility and ownership for their small businesses? why can't we allow them just to flourish rather than try to suffocate them from the beginning? and so i want to read some of these numbers do you. i'm looking at over 30 crosstabs right here, and we compiled this from a number of national and publicly released poll so that the sample size is taken from over 3000 people in each of the three month periods between january 2009 and january of 2000. over a full year now. president obama's approval ratings have declined among every
and thefunctions being done by the old clerical establishment. and you know this. >> the first day in copenhagen climate change 1,000 people were arrested. >> arrested, not sentenced to death. >> okay. arrested. for the violence, but if they are going to kill some people or to burn everywhere, to damage so many things, definitely the approach was more stronger. what you could see in the street of paris or some other places, democracy is good somewhere and that somewhere else, if we are coming to democracy, we should be committed to democracy everywhere. and here we should not have a judgment based on double standard. >> and we will be right back with marouschehv mottaki. >> you say you're doing everything legally and transparentally but you had to reveal a new facility because it was about to be revealed. >> but we had already announced that at that time. therefore, we have fulfilled our obligations. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, r
at the copenhagen conference proved one thing beyond all doubt. green business is big business and the car industry knows that better than anyone. if they want to stay on the road to success they have to be sustainable. and one of the worlds leading auto making countries - germany is taking the development of green cars very seriously. >>reporter: its a fair bet that karl benz would both be proud and appalled in equal measure at what his invention has brought to the world. mercedes benz cars had come to symbolise both status and gas guzzling excess....as do all the luxury german brands. all have taken a hit in the economic downturn....but at a different level from other carmakers: >>pieper: we have this deep recession even in the premium car business...which is a new phenomenon.. .weve never seen this before... so this makes them suffer...but suffer on a high level, so to say. bmw is atbreak even, even in this recession ...audi is making money...porsche is making nice money...even inthe recession. and mercedes has made losses over two quarters...this...and they come out probably the second half. >>
and the countdown to copenhagen 15, which was such a great disappointment. we have now joined by lars vattenfhor. we heard earlier this week, of course, from the president talking about infrastructure, as well as there's big pressures on energy infrastructure at the moment, as well well. how are we, in the failure of copenhagen and the squeezing budgets, it's all about the budget being squeezed this week in europe in particular. how is that going to impact investment in europe in energy infrastructure? >> well, it's all about investment, you can say. and that i mean energy security. i mean climate change. i mean jobs, i mean growth. clearly, what has happened in copen hague.en or what did not happen in copenhagen means higher uncertainty, less investments and a delay. >> but all this pressure, as well, is on government budgets. you can't open a paper. and we talked to jean claude trichet yesterday, the greek prime minister, alistair darling in the uk, you can't open a paper without the discussion of governments having to get down their budget deficit. how is that going impact? >> i think it's going
that it is really a problem, and i think also, the really effective work that was done in copenhagen and trying to get the chinese and the indians in particular on board, because that's a big argument that the opponents make, is that, you know, we're going to do all this, we're going to, you know, raise our energy prices, we're going to make it harder to do business and then china and india are going to go take advantage of that and use that as a competitive advantage and we're going to lose more jobs, so -- but there are lots and lots of examples on both sides of effective messaging and ineffective and i think professor griffin will talk about that later. he'll probably give you a lot more insight into it too. yeah. >> we talked about -- [inaudible] -- if so, why and if you've seen advantages or disadvantages to that or not being a federally registered lobbyist and working through them instead. >> well, i've only been doing this for two years and in the two years i've been doing it, the rules have been very clear, so you know, there is -- there's really not much gray in what i do. you know, i'
... >> we're not doing well. >> rose: the people at copenhagen. >> well, they didn't do it. they didn't do it at all. the only substantial agreement coming out of copenhagen is on avoided deforest station. which is a good step. but now it has to be funded. people have to step up to the plate. and what we're talking about here is the remaining tropical forests which are mostly in the tropical belt around the equator are some of the most underdeveloped countries in the world. we need the standing forest to clean the air. >> rose: right. >> the planet needs that. as well, these forests are... the reservoirs are some of the last remaining biodiversity complicated interrelated sections of biological life. if those people are not... do not have another economic incentive, they're going to have to cut the trees and sell them to... >> rose: or for fuel or something else. >> and what they do is they cut the trees and they plant low-yield crops, subsistence farming. and then they burn the crop residues and that... the... and they burn the forest as well to clear the land. that process accounts for s
yourself. you were at what you call it -- the bun fest at copenhagen. >> someone called the largest county fair any of us will ever see. >> was a rebuff in the end? did the chinese really treat the president badly? did obama lowe's face? >> i don't think so because in the end, at the final meeting, in fact it did meet with chinese premier face to face. the chinese premier, we should say -- at least what we heard -- took offense at something the present said in his address to the entire plan. that morning, friday morning. and then sent lower-level officials at what was supposed to be a face-to-face meeting. the meetings were not just one on one. they included the heads of the larger countries in the eu -- the negotiator for the eu had talked about this. they included the major emerging economies like india, brazil, south africa. they included representatives of some of the least developed and most will vulnerable countries to climate chae like the maldives, who are afraid they will sink below the surface of the ocean, and lesotho, the president was there, and they are head of the least deve
a cnbc exclusive from copenhagen, denmark, is mr. lars sorenson. thank you very much for being here. >> good afternoon, mike. >> when will you launch this drug in the united states? is your sales force ready to hit the ground running? and which doctors will they be targeting? >> our sales force has been ready for months now. this approval process took somewhat longer than we anticipated. so we'll be launching within weeks. we will start out hitting the key opinion leaders, specialists and then broaden out gradually to include all gps in the u.s. >> mr. sorensen, which type 2 diabetics can go on victorza? can they be on other diabetes drugs at the same time or do they have to go off them and take it all by itself? >> vivtorza is a second line treatment for individual 2 diabetes that cannot control blood sugar which is on the most commonly used drug. this means that victoza can replace some of the other second line drugs that are currently being used in the u.s. it is an injectable but very powerful blood sugar-lowering drug with a lot of other benefits. >> mr. sorensen, why are you p
in the functions done by the cash. >> in the first day -- >> you know this. >> copenhagen, lit at change. 1,000 people -- >> arrested, not sentenced to death n. >> arrested. violence. if they are going kill some people or to burn, to damage things, definitely that was more stronger. what you could see in the streets in paris or some of the places, democracy is good somewhere. that's somewhere else? if we are committed to democracy, we should be committed to democracy everywhere. and here we should not have a judgment based on double standard. >> and we will be right back with mottaki, iran's foreign minister. you say you are doing everything legally and transparently. but, of course, you have to reveal a new facility because it was about to be revealed. >> we already announced that at that time. therefore, we -- we have fulfilled our plans. >> you are playing games with me. is it wise to allow a perishable item to spoil? he asked, why leave a room empty? the additional revenue easily covers operating costs. 65 dollars is better than no dollars. okay. $65 for tonight. you can't argue with a
in copenhagen where you saw president obama having to wrestle with all these tensions. can you imagine the nerve it took to walk into closed-door sessions as the president blowing at diplomatic protocol, wrenching the copenhagen assembly out of its original approach and into something new and doing this not knowing if it was going to work. in the article, i wrote about an important moment for president obama and he would get to this one way or another. this would be in the summer of 1864 near the end of president lincoln's first term. he reelection campaign is going and it is not going well. in fact, he in of the political experts in the country think he is going to lose. furthermore they think he is going to lose to general mcclellan who will not pursue lankan score policies in the civil war. lincoln, at that point, is living with the idea that he said hundreds of thousands of young men to their deaths for a failed war. he will be known as the president to failed to hold the union together. he is getting up every morning with that knowledge, living with a wife who was, frankly at times, psychot
the stage for further cooperation with china in preparation for the copenhagen conference on climate change. he discussed exchange rates and trade, clean energy, military to military exchanges, human rights, and stopping the spread of nuclear weapons. we outline the key of compliments of the visit in a joint statement issued by president obama and president hu jintao on november 17. it has been said before that in order to get china right, you have to get the region right. the united states is a vital contributor to asian security and economic prosperity. our active presence in asia helps promote regional security and stability. we intend to deepen our engagement and strengthen our leadership in the region by strengthening our commitments to allies and partners, and enhancing our involvement in regional institutions. and the secretary addressed these issues, as well as our presence in the region, in an important speech in honolulu yesterday. the president's trip to china demonstrates that fact in the region demonstrate the importance we place on east asia which remains vital to u.s. securit
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with a company that does air drops. we went to our own bank in copenhagen. we told them and told them we need a lot of dollar bills. >> they also insist on proof of life and demanded the crew be displayed on deck. >> they took pictures. i wasn't a pirate, but i looked like a pirate so they took pictures when they made the drop. >> this is how it happened. >> we will just cover and wait for the crew to be with you on the deck and take a final photograph. >> crammed in the capsule was the only currency the pirates will accept, brand new u.s. bills, more than $1 million worth of them. >> 100-dollar bills? >> one hundred dollar bills. >> and we had also, in order to try to facilitate the distribution of the funds," we provided a note counter. one of the electric deals the banks have. and they were being paid according to a formula. >> a formula that rifles anything on wall street. >> the suppliers get paid. >> for some reason they couldn't agree so it took them 13 hours to split the loot. and at some point they all crammed into the captain's cabin and they had a major argument about distributing
that international approaches -- global governance on display in copenhagen -- offers the best chance for tackling such a problem in they were offering the best chance to deal with the climate and ecosystems. >> be we need to be able to price carbon as well as understand what the risk of return is. business will be able to unleash this entire potential for a new low carbon economy. it is absolutely critical that we get this deal. whether we get in copenhagen, that is uncertain but we will have a path forward. i think this is the best way forward in order to solve this problem. >> president obama has announced when he is going. he went with all the other leaders. what does this mean for the meeting? >> what we have seen over the past couple of weeks is certainly an increased expectation that we will get out of copenhagen. i think what obama has done recently by setting up a provisional target, by changing the arrival date towards the end of the session which is more important, also by offering some financial increased commitment to help developing countries. >> what do you think about the prospects
. stay with us. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. you'll find the complete -- and completely affordable -- collection from van heusen at the men's store inside jcpenney and at jcp.com. style, quality and price matter. jcpenney. some people say it's the rich, world's bvolcanic soilcome from. that makes our potatoes so special. or maybe the pure water. whatever it is, idaho potatoes are a delicious part of a healthy diet. with zero fat or cholesterol, and only 110 calories, and they taste great. a great value, only about ¢.25 each. always look for the grown in idaho seal. genuine idaho potatoes, from the best earth on earth. ♪ ♪ when it comes to protecting the things you care about... ...leave nothing to chance. travelers. insur
.s. who are desperate to get in. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. boss: hey, those gecko ringtones you put on our website people love 'em! gecko: yeah, thank you sir. turned out nice. boss: got another one for you. anncr: at geico.com, it's easy to get a free rate quote, manage your policy, make payments or even file a claim! boss: now that's a ringtone. gecko: uh yeah...it's interesting.... certainly not the worst ringtone i've ever heard... ♪ ringtone lyrics: a-ringedy- ding-ding-dingy-dong, ringedy-dong-ding-ding... ♪ gecko (to himself): yeah, that might be the worst. anncr: geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. basic package. good choice. only meineke lets you choose your service, choose your savi
the international perspective, was he as successful as he wanted to be going to copenhagen? guest: no, he was not as successful as he wanted to be, but he does given the fact that the u.s. had not adopted any kind of climate legislation. he was able to at least achieved one u.s. objective, which was set up a way the international community can see whether major emerging economies like china, india, brazil, permitting voluntary greenhouse gas emissions cuts they say they are going to be. but he did not achieve the overall goal that many americans and europeans were looking for, which was a binding international agreement to cut greenhouse gas emissions. host: and the reason why he could not that the binding agreement -- was it because he could not get enough international cooperation, or is it just that they did not want to hear what he was trying to say? guest: it was a combination of things. part of it was because the u.s. had not acted on his own -- on its own, he could not commit the u.s. as the number two greenhouse gas emissions -- the matter in the world, to cut emissions. in additi
was wondering if i could say hi to the doctor. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. >>> grilling on the hill. treasury secretary tim geithner ready to defend his actions regarding aig. we preview today's big hearing. >>> and writing a new story in the ebook war. apple ready to release its long anticipated tablet computer. toyota halting some of its most popular cars. those stories and more coming your way. >>> here in davos, the world economic forum is convening for its 40th annual meeting. this is a very different world. after the economic crisis, world leaders will be convening here to try and fix those problems. we'll have some of the top minds. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning. and welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc
in town for a few days, and i was wondering if i could say hi to the doctor. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. >>> let's check some stocks to watch this morning. it's been a huge week for dow components and earnings. this morning we'll talk honeywell, which is not a dow component. >> used to be. >> yeah, yeah. those were the good old days. 91 cents, a penny ahead of expectations on $8.07 billion, reuters was looking for 1.5. the 2010 guidance is 220 to 240. reuters is at 241, although the revenue guidance has -- is -- that's okay. $31.81 is what the street is looking for. >>> mattel reported 81 cents ex-items. barbie up 12%. that 81 cent was above the 68-cent estimate. american girl was flat. barbie was up. >> you keep saying this.
briefly about it in copenhagen. i am worried about the bigger picture. the buy america provisions have cause some disruption. but the back -- the vast majority of our trade with united states is still your intent free beer the real problem is when you see country -- not just the united states -- using a stimulus package to bring in protectionist measures. we all know that what the biggest danger to the global recovery is the spread of protectionism. it has been global trade that has driven growth over the past generation. we would like to see that sustain going forward. we took the very opposite approach. we not only did not put any protectionist members -- measures but repeal -- repeal the number of terrorists in order to stimulate economic activity both here and abroad. that -- repeal of a number of terror acariffs in order to stie economic activity both here and abroad. >> that in many other topics still to come. >> mr. harper, please do something about the environment now. >> is also compelling concerns there about the environment, prime minister. there is a copenhagen accord, but
, such as the u.n. human rights council, and was recently the copenhagen climate change conference, which demonstrated spectacularly the fatuousness of such international structures, eye of common purpose, a common interest,, and governance. and yet the value of these international institutions and paper agreements seems to leave no lasting impression. did we really learn nothing from the early 20th-century experience, with its repeated and dimmed attempts to regulate the capital ships of the great powers for unable conferences? did we really learn nothing from the kellogg pact, whose signatories incidently included germany and japan? it abolished war forever. and inserted a that the u.s. secretary of state won the nobel peace prize. sound familiar? but at least they ashley sign be useless treaty. obama got it for imagined useless treaty, most notably the one he has been insisting on from prague to new york on universal nuclear disarmament. the night it of obama can be seen in his most recent poll, the dramatic -- the most dramatic of which appeared on september 24, one day after obama sp
of copenhagen he walked into a meeting supposed to be a bilateral with china, the chinese were trying to elevate him and he broke in and sat next to llewelyn from brazil, changed the game and got the deal, the five power deal with ever and it's perfectly fits this narrative of obama savings the day of what would have been complete disaster and i don't want to get into great detail but i've noticed this in the cuba policy i tracked closely even up to two or three days before the summit of the americas jeffrey, ambassador, former ambassador to mexico was essentially delivering, excuse this, richard, the neoconservative line of latin america. there was no evidence they were willing to say to diprete position where obama is coming. when he got the portfolio 180-degree shift in the direction comes of this is interesting you set up one attention challenges you got to be losing terribly to get his attention but when you do get his attention there is a very need almost to actually fundamentally change the dynamics and feel that and when you get this access show the narrative in the stories. >> i judge t
of the 2-20 was the shape of the emerging world. i looked back to the scene at copenhagen where the president burst into the room, but who is in the room? brazil, india, china, what is the arrangement of these new power arrangements? secondly, looking forward to the end of his first term, what is it reasonable to ask of this president in shaping what is reasonable to ask of this president in shaping -- >> what is reasonable to ask of this president in shaping this presidency. >> i am not so sure that it is a post american world. -- post-american world. we aren't indispensable nation, -- we are an indispensable nation. in asia, i thought that the coverage of obama's relations with asia was poor. when he came back from asia, the prime minister of india came to the white house for a state visit and obama is effectively in certain the united states into haitian politics and recognizing the degree to which of the rising powers of asia turned to the united states for some kind of leverage and balance. . . obama seems to be moving toward this new alignment. personally, i think this rei
in copenhagen where he said, the problem is the white people in the world. the second question is there is a country -- a company in brazil that is an offshore drilling company that in june, the obama administration gave a $15 billion loan to and i think is quite ironic that in february, george soros bought majority shares in that company. effectively, this administration has paid back george soros for getting elected with taxpayer funds. guest: i do not know anything about the second issue, but i can comment on the first. the brazilian president is a colorful, charismatic leader. then he has been for some to, to a half years. very annoyed that they have had to do things that the united states and europe-not have to do. and he has -- have not had to do. and he has been very open about saying that they have not had to do things that they've had to do in developing countries. host: salt lake city, democratic cruller. caller: we have -- and democratic collar. host: we have more natural gas than any of the country. wyoming has a huge amount. we have not even put pipelines for the n
of london or manchester, or copenhagen or paris. and so it's very hard than with the multiple theaters at play when we're talking about the terrorism threat of the 21st century, to say we're in one paradigm or the other. and i think one of the things we have failed collectively as an american society to do is to decide how we're going to deal with this threat. and to deal with it in a way that, not only appears legitimate perhaps to the international committee, but is it constitutionally legitimate. much of the debate in a prior administration surrounded the military commissions act and the military commissions, but i think the larger question of how to deal with known terrorist actors who are trained, connected to this international network, but against whom we may not have sufficient evidence to present in a criminal context or even a military commission context, what do you do about those threats. remained initiative and useful yesterday in the president's address where the president said, that with respect to the many detainees and ensemble, given the conditions on the ground in ye
manifestations. the united nations, the various parties, and most recently, the copenhagen conference, which demonstrated the fatuousness of such international structures. çóyet this seems to leave no lasting impression. we really have learned nothing from the early 20th-Ñicentury experience, from repeated and doomed attempts to regulate the capital shifts of the great powers. did we learn nothing from the kellogg pact that abolished war forever, with a certainty that one frank keller look at the nobel peace prize in 1929? sound familiar? but i believe kellogg actually signed a treaty. [laughter] obama got it over imagined useless treaties, like those insisted on for nuclear disarmament. the best of the internationalism can be seen in the pursuit of the global, the most dramatic instance of which occurred on september 24, one day after obama's speech to the general assembly where he ostentatiously addressed to the security council. obama had knowledge thadr iran had constructed a secret uranium enrichment facility. the french and british were urging him to use that study at the council to
ahead. caller: are you aware of the president's -- the brazilian president's speech in copenhagen where he said, the problem is the white people in the world. the second question is there is a country -- a company in brazil that is an offshore drilling company that in june, the obama administration gave a $15 billion loan to and i think is quite ironic that in february, george soros bought majority shares in that company. effectively, this administration has paid back george soros for getting elected with taxpayer funds. guest: i do not know anything about the second issue, but i can comment on the first. the brazilian president is a colorful, charismatic leader. then he has been for some to, to a half years. very annoyed that they have had to do things that the united states and europe-not have to do. and he has -- have not had to do. and he has been very open about saying that they have not had to do things that they've had to do in developing countries. host: salt lake city, democratic cruller. caller: we have -- and democratic collar. host: we have more natural gas than any of the c
on copenhagen, didn't really get a consensus going except yeah, we're going to have another meeting in a while. but you say enough of that poppy cock. it's time to move to plan b. what is plan b in your estimation? what should we be doing? >> plan b is what mankind has always done throughout the ages what mankind does in different parts of the globe at the present time where the temperature is very different in countries, very cold countries and what people do is they adapt. mankind is superb and at adapting and we are better now because of modern technology adapt to go whatever nature and the climate throws at us than we've ever been before. so that is what we should do. that is what we will do. that is plan b. the idea that you can get a global agreement on decor car -- decarbonization is poppy cook. even if you did, it shows you're not going to. the meeting later this year is a complete waste of time. even if you did get an agreement, the cost to the economy will be far greater than any benefit you would conceivably get. >> so you suggest -- we just keep using fossil fuel, carbon based stuf
korea, and afghanistan. the president said the stage for further cooperation in copenhagen on climate change. he discussed exchange rates and trade, clean energy, military-to-military education changes, human rights, and stopping the right of spread of the nuclear weapons. in a joint statement issued by president obama and jintao. in order to get china right, you have to get the region right. this is the vital to economic prosperity. our act of presence helps promote regional security and stability. we intend to deepen our engagement and strengthen by strengthening our commitments to allies and partners and enhancing our involvement in regional institutions. the secretary addressed these issues as well as our presence in the region in an important speech in honolulu yesterday. the president's trip to china -- and the region, demonstrated the importance we place on east asia which remains vital to u.s. security and prosperity. in the november joint statement, the chinese recognize the positive role that the united states plays by saying they welcome the united states has a an asia-paci
to copenhagen last month. the summit did not produce much progress, it did reportedly produce big hits at the expense accounts, we hear, cbs reports more than 100 members of congress and their spouses dropped tens of thousands of dollars for luxury suites and dinners. martha: oops. bill: 15 democratic congressmen and 6 republican members of the house, room and food bills ran $4400 each for two days. a pretty good eatin'. martha: i heard one say, it was a business trip. bill: more than two grand a day. and adds to that the cost of the flight to denmark, commercial and military and the bill total tops the $1 million mark. martha: okay. bill: your money! martha: yeah, that's right. all right, here's the question -- a question for you, still playing the blame game after a year in the oval office, the white house continuing to harken back to the bush administration, quite a bit in fact to explain the state of the country. calling out the previous administration at least 7 times just since last tuesday. when republican scott brown won the massachusetts senate seat. steve hildebrand is a form
's -- the brazilian president's speech in copenhagen where he said, the problem is the white people in the world. the second question is there is a country -- a company in brazil that is an offshore drilling company that in june, the obama administration gave a $15 billion loan to and i think is quite ironic that in february, george soros bought majority shares in that company. effectively, this administration has paid back george soros for getting elected with taxpayer funds. guest: i do not know anything about the second issue, but i can comment on the first. the brazilian president is a colorful, charismatic leader. then he has been for some to, to a half years. very annoyed that they have had to do things that the united states and europe-not have to do. and he has -- have not had to do. and he has been very open about saying that they have not had to do things that they've had to do in developing countries. host: salt lake city, democratic cruller. caller: we have -- and democratic collar. host: we have more natural gas than any of the country. wyoming has a huge amount. we have not even pu
the british prime minister paul them out for failing to live up to his promises in copenhagen about imposing a carbon tax. the president fully expected that his hundreds of supporters would stand in share while the justices remained seated and silent, unable to respond even after word. moreover, the president's speech was only released 30 minutes before the event, after the justices or already present." "the new york times" online is saying the justice alito was right on the substance issue, saying "not true" to how the president characterized the decision. but "the american prospect" on- line said that, but what i democracy, it is okay to -- "in democracy, it is okay to criticize public officials." good morning. caller: can you hear me clearly? host: we can. caller: excellent it might take on the dialogue between a twa jet went -- two in the two gentlemen here is that mr. president, if you do the research -- as political campaign was funded by a special interests. goldman sachs is one of his sponsors, if you will. the whole political process -- the judges, the selection process -- everythin
there was any disagreement amongst the countries of copenhagen that allowed the pitcher rise above 2 degrees by 2015. it would be something the would be very serious indeed and therefore, the major countries in the world and not all countries except that at the conclusion and are working within that. the key issue now is for the countries to make the cut ends as they promised to do to the national plan for climate change target's and make them public and internationally registered so that we can bring people together probably in the next few months to see what progress we can make on getting a final climate change agreement. i will take two more. yes. >> brann willson from the sun. returning to the aplington keys to talk to the importance of learning lessons from this case. we now have a specific proposal on the table to allow full publication's reviews protecting the anonymity of the children and witnesses. are you prepared to change your mind and back of that proposal? >> i think the you have got to get to the background of what's happened here before you drawback to that conclusion. all o
. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. >>> welcome to "worldwide exchange." in the states on this monday, investors focusing on obama's state of the union address sxhins of earnings reports. >> and in europe, banking shares are now topping the markets after an initial sell-off. >> here in asia, analysts say the obama bank plan is unlikely to affect banks in the region too badly. >> we had a pretty strong sell-off in the latter part of the week. we've had triple digit moves for about five days in a row. volatility has seemingly returned. we have steadily improved, although we've been strong since the start. that plus 89 was plus 69 when we came on the air, so we're basically close to 120 points to the good in the dow. we have positive i
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